Easing Atmospheric CO2 Levels Using Nanotubes and Sunlight

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Researchers at The Pennsylvania State University have determined a way to use arrays of nanotubes in a solar-based process to convert carbon dioxide and water into methane and other hydrocarbon fuels. Their method may provide a new way to reduce carbon-dioxide levels in the atmosphere—rising due to our planet’s heavy use of fossil fuels—as well as produce alternative fuels. The rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) conversion using this method is 20 times higher than that of previously published research. The work is described in the January 27, 2009, online edition of Nano Letters.”Every 12 days the world consumes about one billion barrels of oil, which represents the release of almost 1 trillion pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere,” said the study’s lead researcher, Craig Grimes, to PhysOrg.com. “One way of dealing with this problem is by recycling the CO2 into a high-energy-content fuel, but this makes sense only if a renewable energy source, like solar energy, can be used in the process.”This type of solar-based conversion process only works if a photocatalyst—a material that reacts with light—is used to convert the CO2 into hydrocarbons. A photocatalyst that utilizes the most solar energy possible is the best option.One popular photocatalyst candidate for the job has been titanium dioxide, also called titania, because it can powerfully react with oxygen. But so far, researchers haven’t been able to make titania perform adequately despite experimenting with a variety of forms, such as nanoparticles, pellets, and multi-layer films.Grimes and his colleagues used arrays of titania nanotubes. They created the nanotubes using a technique that incorporates nitrogen into the nanotubes’ structures, which the researchers initially thought would help increase the conversion rate (this turned out to be true only in a very limited capacity).The process also yields a high total surface area compared to other forms of the material, a property that aids in the conversion. To further boost the process, the group scattered an ultra-thin layer of platinum and/or copper “cocatalyst” nanoparticles on the surface of the array.The nanotubes were as long as 140 micrometers (millionths of a meter) in length and a diameter of about 115 nanometers (billionths of a meter). The total size of each array sample was about 2 centimeters square and the group created several samples.The researchers made two reaction chambers, each with a window at the top to let in sunlight. They loaded one sample into each chamber and evacuated the air out, producing a vacuum, and sealed them. Next they pumped CO2 through a tank of water and into the chambers, flushing it through via intake and outtake valves for 10 minutes.This all took place outdoors on sunny or mostly-sunny days on the Penn State campus. The samples were left outside for 2.5 hours, up to a maxiumum of 3.5 hours, between about 12:30 and 4:00 p.m.Analysis of the chambers’ interiors showed that the predominant product of the conversion was methane, with some ethane, propane, butane, pentane, and hexane, along with other materials in very small concentrations. The conversion rates were high, although comparing the results with other published results was rather difficult, according to the group.”Most of the previous results were achieved using nanoparticles illuminated by ultraviolet light, so we were not exactly comparing apples to apples,” said Grimes. “But going by the weight of the material, we could figure out that the rate of hydrocarbon production we achieved is at least 20 times higher than those previous studies.”Grimes and his group attribute their success, in large part, to the cocatalyst particles they used. They think that a homogeneous distribution of both types could further increase the conversion rate.More information: Nano Lett., 2009, 9 (2), pp 731-737 DOI: 10.1021/nl803258pCopyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Easing Atmospheric CO2 Levels Using Nanotubes and Sunlight (2009, February 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-02-easing-atmospheric-co2-nanotubes-sunlight.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further City dwellers can have an outsized impact on curbing global warming A digital photograph of one of the reaction chambers under natural sunlight. Photo courtesy Craig Grimes.last_img read more

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Pair of noted physicists contemplate future of cosmology after detection of primordial

first_img(Phys.org) —Physicists Joseph Silk of Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris and Jens Chluba of Johns Hopkins University have together published a Perspective piece in the journal Science, where they discuss the future of cosmological research in the wake of the detection two month ago, of primordial gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). They suggest several possibilities and detail the pros and cons of each. Citation: Pair of noted physicists contemplate future of cosmology after detection of primordial gravitational waves (2014, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-pair-physicists-contemplate-future-cosmology.html This past March researchers using the BICEP2 (background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization) telescope located at the South Pole found evidence of gravitational waves believed to have been generated by the Big Bang—evidence that gives a lot of credence to the theory of inflation. The theory had predicted that a certain light signature would be present in the CMB which matches what was observed at BICEP2. The findings don’t prove inflation theory correct, but the detection of primordial gravitational waves has caused many in the cosmology community to become believers. Because of that, new research that will offer even more proof of the correctness of the theory is likely to be conducted. But, which sorts of research and how might it be carried out has yet to be decided. It was for this reason that Silk and Chluba have composed their article—they hope to organize the discussion which will hopefully lead to the best and most promising experiments being conducted. They suggest the most logical place to start would be sending a spectrometer into space able to detect tiny deviations in the energy spectrum in the CMB—a space based device, they reason would be more sensitive giving better readings.The aim of such research efforts, the pair suggest would be to find evidence of recombinant radiation, which inflation theorists believe would have come from a time just after the Big Bang when temperatures dropped enough to allow for the formation of electrically neutral atoms—photons would have decoupled from matter causing light to shine throughout the universe and causing the creation of the CMB. Finding proof that such radiation exists would prove, the two suggest, that the universe did indeed cool down as theory predicts.Silk and Chluba also note that research projects currently under consideration by NASA and the ESA are likely to be heavily impacted by the detection at BICEP2 and because of that will have to be modified to take into account what has been learned, and perhaps add something new.Another goal, the two authors propose would be seeking the detection of “spectroscopically deviant” patches in the CMB—evidence of which would suggest the existence of other universes. Journal information: Science Researchers detect B-mode polarization in cosmic microwave background The Dark Sector Laboratory at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. At left is the South Pole Telescope. At right is the BICEP2 telescope. Credit: Amble/Wikipediacenter_img More information: Next Steps for Cosmology, Science 9 May 2014: Vol. 344 no. 6184 pp. 586-588. DOI: 10.1126/science.1252724AbstractExperiments on the ground, balloons, and satellites have revolutionized our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring the fossil glow from the first instants of the universe, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Infinitesimal fluctuations in the photon temperature have been found, revealing the seeds of all large-scale structures, from galaxies to clusters of galaxies and superclusters. The detected wiggles in the distribution of the temperature fluctuations measure the gravitational coupling between dark matter, baryons, and radiation as the universe emerged from its opaque fireball phase. These measurements, pioneered by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) (1) and then greatly refined by its successors, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) (2) and Planck (3) satellites, have allowed precise determinations of the key parameters of our universe—age, dark matter, dark energy content, and even the number of different types of neutrinos, as well as the strength and distribution of the primordial density fluctuations. Less than two decades ago, it was debated whether the major constituent of the universe, dark energy, even existed. Now its contribution is measured to an accuracy of a few percent. © 2014 Phys.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Researchers offer possible explanation for lack of radiation flash from gas cloud

first_img © 2014 Phys.org Comparison of the pv-diagrams from spring 2013 (data already presented in Gillessen et al. 2013b), late summer 2013 and spring 2014 (new data). The blue line corresponds to the Brackett-γ based orbit from Gillessen et al. (2013b), along which the pv-diagram is extracted. We have blended out the range between −660 km/s and +240 km/s to avoid emission from the mini-spiral (Paumard et al. 2004) visible at these wavelengths. The scaling is adjusted in each map individually to optimally show the structure of the gaseous emission; the maps cannot be compared photometrically to each other. Credit: arXiv:1407.4354 [astro-ph.GA] Journal information: arXiv Explore further The gas cloud, named G2, was first spotted back in 2011, moving towards Sagittarius A*, the super massive black hole believed to exist at the center of our galaxy. Scientists expected a sudden surge in X-rays and radio waves and maybe even a possible brightening of infrared light from the site. Instead, as the gas cloud encountered the black hole, nothing much happened. The cloud simply changed shape a little bit with little to no fanfare, leaving scientists who had trained a lot of telescopes on the Milky Way’s center, feeling let down. In their paper, the researchers in Germany offer a possible explanation regarding why so little appeared to happen.G2, the researchers suggest, is actually part of a continuous stream of material that was ripped from the envelope of a star as recently as just a hundred years ago. They note that G1, another gas cloud spotted over a decade ago, has an identical orbit to G2, and is even in the same plane. They believe both clouds are actually little more than clumps in a much bigger cloud that is essentially a stream of gas that has been traveling towards the center of the Milky Way for a century. And because of that, they suggest, the clumps simply brush Sagittarius A* as they approach and pass by, because of the impact on them exerted by the rest of the stream. If true, it would seem likely that there are other clouds also present in the stream, which are perhaps destined for a rendezvous with Sagittarius A* someday—if so, one of them might produce the fireworks the scientists had been anticipating. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute in Germany has offered a possible explanation for the lack of fireworks during the interaction between a gas cloud and the black hole believed to be at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. In their paper uploaded to the prepress server arXiv, the researchers suggest that the expected fireworks didn’t happen because the gas cloud is actually a dense clump that is part of a continuous stream of matter and because of that it only brushed the black hole rather than gushed into it.center_img More information: The Galactic Center cloud G2 and its gas streamer, arXiv:1407.4354 [astro-ph.GA] arxiv.org/abs/1407.4354AbstractWe present new, deep near-infrared SINFONI @ VLT integral field spectroscopy of the gas cloud G2 in the Galactic Center, from late summer 2013 and spring 2014. G2 is visible in recombination line emission. The spatially resolved kinematic data track the ongoing tidal disruption. As expected for an observation near pericenter passage, roughly half of the gas in 2014 is found at the redshifted, pre-pericenter side of the orbit, while the other half is at the post-pericenter, blueshifted side. We also present an orbital solution for the gas cloud G1, which was discovered a decade ago in L’-band images when it was spatially almost coincident with Sgr A*. The orientation of the G1 orbit in the three angles is almost identical to the one of G2, but it has a lower eccentricity and smaller semi-major axis. We show that the observed astrometric positions and radial velocities of G1 are compatible with the G2 orbit, assuming that (i) G1 was originally on the G2 orbit preceding G2 by 13 years and (ii) a simple drag force acted on it during pericenter passage. Taken together with the previously described tail of G2, which we detect in recombination line emission and thermal broadband emission, we propose that G2 may be a bright knot in a much more extensive gas streamer. This matches purely gaseous models for G2, such as a stellar wind clump or the tidal debris from a partial disruption of a star. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers suggest gas cloud could reveal black holes near center of Milky Way galaxy Citation: Researchers offer possible explanation for lack of radiation flash from gas cloud interaction with Milky Way black hole (2014, July 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-07-explanation-lack-gas-cloud-interaction.htmllast_img read more

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Scientists develop atomicscale hardware to implement natural computing

first_imgThese traits are very different from those of conventional computers and could be used to solve unique sets of complex problems. The researchers see particular applications in the area of reservoir computing, which has the potential to process information at very high rates.”Potential applications include running multiple simulations of financial markets, recognition of information in error-prone and noisy data, such as vision and speech, all the way to autonomous navigation in changing environments, such as after earthquakes or disasters,” Gimzewski said. “Finally, reservoir computing has a role to play in medicine in the cognitive and neurosciences.”The researchers hope that the new fabrication strategy of seed-directed growth used here will provide a novel hardware platform for reservoir computing and other types of natural computing based on complex systems.”We plan to move towards a hybrid morphic system using the best of conventional computation with our brain-like device capabilities, and to develop a new form of programming that relies on distributed memory and synaptic networks,” Gimzewski said. “This would be a radical step in the real development of AI.” Unfortunately, conventional fabrication methods used for today’s computers cannot be used to realize complex systems to their full potential due to scaling limits—the methods simply cannot make small enough interconnected units. Now in a new paper published in Nanotechnology, researchers at UCLA and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan have developed a method to fabricate a self-organized complex device called an atomic switch network that is in many ways similar to a brain or other natural or cognitive computing device.”Complex phenomena and self-organization—though ubiquitous in nature, social behavior, and the economy—have never been successfully used in conventional computers for prediction and modelling,” James Gimzewski, Chemistry Professor at UCLA, told Phys.org. “The device we have created is capable of rapidly generating self-organization in a small chip with high speed. Furthermore, it bypasses the issue of exponential machine complexity required as a function of problem complexity as in today’s computers. Our first steps form the basis for a new type of computation that is urgently needed in our ever increasingly connected world.” Journal information: Nanotechnology Researchers seeking to make computer brains smarter by making them more like our own Citation: Scientists develop atomic-scale hardware to implement natural computing (2015, May 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-scientists-atomic-scale-hardware-natural.html SEM images of various atomic switch networks consisting of silver nanowires. (a) and (b) lack reliable network density while (c) provides a tunable density of nanowires and spatially defined topology. The network is capable of emergent behavior and constant adaptation, traits of a brain-like complex system. Scale bar = 50 µm. Credit: Demis, et al. ©2015 IOP Publishing (Phys.org)—Despite the many great achievements of computers, no man-made computer can learn from its environment, adapt to its surroundings, spontaneously self-organize, and solve complex problems that require these abilities as well as a biological brain. These abilities arise from the fact that the brain is a complex system capable of emergent behavior, meaning that the system involves interactions between many units resulting in macroscale behavior that cannot be attributed to any individual unit. An atomic switch network, showing (a) the array of platinum electrodes and (b) an SEM image of self-organized silver nanowires on a grid of copper posts. Overlapping junctions of wires form atomic switches. Scale bar = 500 µm. Credit: Demis, et al. ©2015 IOP Publishing Explore further More information: E. C. Demis, et al. “Atomic switch networks—nanoarchitectonic design of a complex system for natural computing.” Nanotechnology. DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/26/20/204003 © 2015 Phys.org As the researchers explain, an atomic switch is a nanoscale device that exhibits memristive resistance, meaning that it adjusts its resistance to an applied current or voltage based on its memory of previous encounters. This trait is essential for complex systems because it underlies the ability to learn, interact with the environment, and address problems in which data is constantly changing or incomplete. Although some natural computing devices use natural materials, the atomic switch network developed here is made entirely of inorganic materials. Lithographically patterned copper posts form a “patterned seed network,” on top of which silver nanowires are grown. The end result is a network of silver sulfide switches and silver nanowires that connect the switches. Experiments demonstrated that the atomic switch network exhibits emergent behavior, in which interactions between the individual atomic switches lead to patterns of electrical activity that cannot be attributed to any individual switch, but only to the network as a whole. The atomic switch network also has an intrinsic capacity for adaptation, since the silver nanowire connections are constantly reconfiguring themselves and the switches are constantly forming and dissolving in different locations in the network. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Organic vortex lasers could be used in future 3D displays

first_img SEM micrographs of Archimedean spirals with (a) one, (b) two, and (c) three arms. Credit: Stellinga et al. ©2018 American Chemical Society The main way to do this is by controlling the number of “arms” the Archimedean spiral has. The number of arms is equal to the light beam’s topological charge, which is the number of twists the light beam makes in one wavelength. So the larger the number of arms, the tighter the helix of the light beam. Here, the researchers demonstrated Archimedean spiral gratings with between zero (no twist) and three arms. This new method for generating vortex lasers has advantages over previous methods in that the beams can be generated in a single step and by a single optical element (the grating). With these advantages, the researchers expect that the results will pave the way toward implementing vortex lasers in a variety of applications.”My main interest is in organic semiconductors, which can be simply patterned to make devices like this,” said Samuel, whose group provided the organic semiconductor gain material and conducted the measurements. “A long-term aim is to make such lasers electrically, rather than optically, driven. A nearer term aim is to use such lasers for sensing explosive vapor.”Krauss, whose group designed the nanostructures used in the study, is particularly interested in displays and microscopy applications.”In displays, you could use the different vortex orders to multiplex information—for example, to project multiple images at once,” he said. “Vortex beams are of interest in microscopy, so one can imagine an array of such beams for massively parallel microscopy.” Researchers have developed a new type of organic vortex laser, which is a laser that emits a helical beam of light. In the future, miniature arrays of these vortex lasers, each with a slightly different spiral shape, may be used in applications such as 3D TV displays, microscopy, and as information carriers for visible light communications. Explore further Illustration of an array of organic vortex lasers, each with a different spiral and therefore a different topological charge. Credit: Stellinga et al. ©2018 American Chemical Society The researchers, led by Ifor D. W. Samuel at the University of St. Andrews and Thomas F. Krauss at the University of York, both in the UK, have published a paper on the organic vortex lasers in a recent issue of ACS Nano.”Laser arrays have been demonstrated before, but not with such control over the beamshape,” Krauss told Phys.org. “Our approach allows us to make vortex beams of controlled topological charge. We can make Airy beams or Bessel beams. Similarly, metasurfaces that generate such bespoke beams have been demonstrated before, but they have been passive elements, not active lasers.” Previously, vortex laser beams have been generated by taking a laser and using separate optical components to shape the beam, resulting in large beams. The new vortex lasers demonstrated here have a nanostructured gain medium that generates the vortex beam directly. This means that it can be scaled down into miniature beams, which can then be arranged into an array. The miniaturized version is expected to be much more useful for practical applications.In order to generate helical light beams, the researchers designed an optical grating consisting of an Archimedean spiral. When light passes through the grating, it emerges as a helical beam. By controlling the dimensions of the spiral grating, it’s possible to control the properties of the light beam. Journal information: ACS Nanocenter_img More information: Daan Stellinga et al. “An organic vortex laser.” ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b07703 Laser beams with a ‘twist’ © 2018 Phys.org Citation: Organic vortex lasers could be used in future 3-D displays (2018, February 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-vortex-lasers-future-d.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Researchers observe inwardly rotating spirals in a nonoscillatory medium

first_img Credit: H. N. Yoshikawa “At a sufficiently high flow-rate, liquid curtains appear, move like waves and, end up coiling around some center point and forming rotating spiral arms,” Mathis explained. “We measured the frequency of rotation of each arm and of the whole pattern and the length of arms. The key observation is the spontaneous formation of spirals through breaking the rotational symmetry of the system.” © 2019 Science X Network Sac with spiral surface patterns facilitate substance delivery Citation: Researchers observe inwardly rotating spirals in a nonoscillatory medium (2019, January 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-inwardly-rotating-spirals-nonoscillatory-medium.html Explore further Journal information: Physical Review Letters A team of researchers at Université Côte d’Azur and Hokkaido University have recently carried out a study exploring the spontaneous formation of spiral patterns observed on the downward-facing free surface of a horizontal liquid film. The surface examined by them entails Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which destabilizes the interface between two fluids of different densities when the heavier fluid is pushing down the lighter one. More information: Harunori N. Yoshikawa et al. Inwardly Rotating Spirals in a Nonoscillatory Medium, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.014502 The researchers observed that the liquid discharge resulting from this instability can occur in the form of propagating liquid curtains, which are generated at the film’s circular periphery and appear as inwardly rotating spiral arms. Using a phenomenologically constructed cellular automaton, they demonstrated that these patterns arise from the phase locking, which leads to an intermittent discharge of liquid at a constant flow rate over the entire film surface. “About 15 years ago, Dr. Laurent Limat and his colleagues studied spatio-temporal dynamics of liquid columns moving freely along the edge of a circular dish,” Christian Mathis, one of the researchers who carried out the present study, told Phys.org. “Inspired by their work, we began the study of a bi-dimensional assembly of liquid columns, hoping to describe all the secondary instabilities related to losses of symmetry. We just found one such instability, but we discovered that we were in front of a rather simple system showing extremely rich behavior.”In their study, Mathis and his colleagues observed that increasing the flow rate gave rise to a series of complex patterns, including a regular hexagonal lattice of drops, a regular hexagonal lattice of columns, spatio-temporally intermittent behavior of columns and, finally, liquid curtains forming spiral waves. The apparatus they used is fairly simple, consisting primarily of a semi-closed cylindrical vessel, with silicone oil continuously pouring into it through an inlet at the top and a fine mesh grid at the bottom. The vessel contains a constant amount of oil, determined by the equilibrium of a negative pressure in the vessel and the weight of the oil. Excessive liquid in the vessel leaks through the grid and forms a liquid film underneath it. This film destabilizes in different ways, depending on the oil flow-rate and viscosity. Inside this apparatus, everything is made of transparent PMMA, as this enables easy observation and precise video measurements with adapted lightning. Spiral patterns can be found in many systems, both in lab experiments and in nature. Most of these spirals patterns rotate, with the spiral arms trailing the direction of this rotation. Patterns that rotate in the opposite direction are quite rare and are referred to as antispirals. “We have shown that antispiral patterns can be produced in a simple liquid system, for which we know all the governing equations,” Harunori Yoshikawa, another researcher who carried out the study, told Phys.org. “Deep investigation of this ‘well-known’ system would provide insights into rare occurrences of antispiral patterns.”The experiment carried out by Yoshikawa, Mathis and their colleagues could pave the way for further studies exploring the manifestation of antispiral patterns. In addition, their study could provide a benchmark for theories of pattern formation. “We are now focusing on theoretical modeling, seeking an appropriate model equation and the ranges of involved parameters,” Yoshikawa said. “We hope that we will theoretically reveal the essential features of these pattern formation processes.”The researchers are also currently exploring other patterns observed in their system, as the inwardly rotating spirals were merely one of their observations. For instance, the dripping regime and some of the peculiar behavior of the liquid columns are yet to be extensively investigated. In the study carried out by Mathis, Yoshikawa and their colleagues, the dynamic of the spirals appeared to be related to the characteristics of the liquid film itself, a finding that they are also looking to explore further. Credit: H. N. Yoshikawa This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Music in her elements

I dance for myself and not for my audience. Dance is everything for me—be it walking, talking, speaking or living,’ says Shobha Deepak Singh.Shobha started her cultural journey in 1968 when she joined Bhartiya Kala Kendra. Later, she became the first manager of Kamani auditorium. Through script writing, production and direction, she also got involved with the Bhartiya Kala Kendra. ‘I studied at Modern School and graduated in economic from Delhi University in 1963. In 1977, I completed my degree in Bachelor of Performing Arts and a decade and a half later, joined the direction course of Living Theatre, under the tutelage of the legendary E Alkazi. Here, I earned an opportunity for training in production of allied arts such as light and set design and music for plays such as Virasat, Royal Hunt of the Sun, Three Sisters, Three Greek Tragedies, A Streetcar Named Desire and Death of a Salesman. I later worked as an Assistant Director for four productions,’ she explained. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’She studied dance under the tutelage of eminent artistes including Shambhu Maharaj and Birju Maharaj and took music lessons from Biswajeet Roy Chowdhary and Amjad Ali Khan.‘Not many know that I am an ardent photographer as well. I possess a rare collection of over 1,00,000 pictures of personalities associated with the performing arts which have been extensively used by leading dailies and magazines. In 1996 and more recently in November 2003, my theatrical photographs were displayed under ‘Art Heritage’, she said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘I get inspired by reading diverse subjects. Heritage architecture and daily news and happenings are my other pastimes. For me, the process of learning never stops,’ Shobha added. Rechristened as the Iron Lady of Indian Music, Shobha Deepak Singh is currently occupied with her next presentation. Titled Ramlila, she has syncronized the show. ‘I have a cross cultural approach. I have an experience of more than 40 years. Hence, the word boredom doesn’t exist in my dictionary,’ Shobha said. ‘My calendar is busy with successive events. It commences with Janmashtami, when we present ‘Krishna’, followed by Ramlila during Diwali time and then by a musical festival in the month of November,’ she added.Today, as director of the Shriram Bhartiya Kala Kendra, Shobha aspires to take it to exemplary heights.DETAILAt: Kendra Lawns,  1, Copernicus MargWhen: October 15th to November 11thTimings: 6.30 pm to 9.15 pm Phone: 41553037 read more

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Man duped of Rs 1 lakh near Paribesh Bhavan

first_imgKolkata: A person was duped by three other over exchange of US dollars. The incident took place on Tuesday morning in front of Paribesh Bhavan in Salt Lake.According to police, on Tuesday morning a person named Abdul Halim, a resident of Karaya, went to Bidhannagar South police station and informed that he has been cheated of Rs one lakh. He was promised hundred notes of 20 US dollar.According to the complaint filed, Halim had met a person at Chittaranjan National Medical College called Kabil on August 30. Kabil was collecting help stating that he needs money for his father’s heart operation. On hearing this, Halim gave him a hundred rupee note. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeImmediately after that Bilal took out a 20 US dollar note and asked Halim to exchange it. When Halim asked as to how he got this dollar, Kabil said his father used to work abroad and earned some dollars during his tenure. He added that he has such 100 notes at home at a remote village and would want to exchange all the dollars.Following this Halim took the dollar and exchanged it from Park Street. He handed over Rs 950 to Kabil and his father at the Paribesh Bhavan crossing. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedKabil told Halim that his father’s operation will be done at a hospital in Salt Lake opposite Salt Lake stadium. He urgently needed Rs 1 Lakh for the operation and in return, he will give him his dollars.As per the deal, Halim reached Paribesh Bhavan the next day in the morning. Around 8:50 am, Kabil’s brother Musha and his father came with a packet wrapped in a towel. After the money and packet was exchanged, Musha asked Halim to verify the dollars.While Halim was unpacking it, both Musha and his father fled. On opening the packet, he found some folded newspapers and a diswashing soap bar.last_img read more

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Stranded tourists airlifted after rain halts in North Sikkim

first_imgDarjeeling: With the rains receding, evacuation of tourists was carried out by the Indian Army and Air Force in North Sikkim. National Highways 10, 31 and 31 C were restored, connecting Sikkim, Kalimpong and parts of Dooars with Siliguri.Connectivity of Sikkim and parts of Jalpaiguri remained cut off from Siliguri, owing to multiple landslides on National Highway 10, 31 and 31 C since Friday night, triggered by incessant rainfall. At many places the roads were washed away, while in others debris and rocks blocked the roads. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe worst affected was North Sikkim, with road connectivity between Mangan to Chungthang being totally damaged. Bridges were also washed away. The road from Gangtok to Mangan was also affected, resulting in tourists being stranded in Lachung, Chatten and Chungthang in North Sikkim.On Sunday, Trishakti Corps of the Indian Army and Indian Air Force, in coordination with civil administration, commenced air evacuation of tourists stranded in North Sikkim. On request of aid by the civil administration, helicopters of Army Aviation and Air Force were pressed into service. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe helicopters flew several sorties to Gangtok and Sevok. Around 100 persons including senior citizens, children, tourists and the sick were evacuated. Medical aid was also provided to people requiring medical assistance before they were airlifted.”The Indian Army has also made necessary arrangements for tents, blankets and food for the stranded tourists,” stated an Army release.”With rains receding on Sunday, evacuation operations were possible. Work is on to open up the roads. Heavy machinery including earth movers have been pressed into service. It will take around 14 days to repair the road from Mangan to Chungthang and around 3 days to restore road connectivity from Mangan to Gangtok. GREF is working on a war footing,” stated Karma Bonpo, District Collector, North District, Sikkim, while talking to Millennium Post. The situation in Mangan in North Sikkim has improved considerably, with water supply and electricity being restored. Some houses have been damaged. Families residing in 3 buildings in Mangan were evacuated. “However no loss of life has been reported,” added the DC.”We have been working on a war footing to open up the NH 10, 31 and 31 C in West Bengal. Earth moving and cutting machinery has been pressed into service,” stated Uttam Pradhan, Assistant Engineer, NH.It was a trying time for both locals and tourists on Saturday. While many waited on the roads, others tried to negotiate the slide near Sevok by crossing over on foot.last_img read more

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Block Health Centre at Mirik to get upgraded

first_imgDarjeeling: Block Health Centre at Mirik is all set to get upgraded to a Sub-Divisional Hospital. Incidentally, Mirik was upgraded to a full-fledged sub-division from a block in Darjeeling on March 30, 2017. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had recently stated that Mirik hospital wouldsoon be upgraded. The Health department has already given a go-ahead to the upgradation of the existing hospital to a Sub-Divisional hospital. “This is to ensure that people of the sub-division get proper medical assistance without having to go outside. A new building will be constructed in the vacant land behind the existing hospital,” stated Dr Pralay Acharya, CMOH, Darjeeling. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe existing three-storey building will be renovated and a new four-storey building will come up. Estimates are being prepared for civil and electrical works. After we get the sanctions we will float tenders for the construction,” stated the CMOH. Sanctions will also be required for human resource. “The existing building will house the Out Patient department and have diagnostic facilities. The new building will house the In Patient department including Male and female medical wards; Male and female surgical wards; Obstetric ward; Paediatric ward; SNSU and a 6-bed HDU. A blood bank is also on the anvil,” stated Doctor Acharya. Currently, Block Health Centre is 30-bed and consists of five doctors and 15 nursing staff. “With the upgrade, there will be 100 beds with 20 doctors. The nursing staff strength will also be increased” added the CMOH.last_img read more

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